The South

Where tea is sweet and accents are sweeter; summer starts in April; front porches are wide and words are long; macaroni and cheese is a vegetable; pecan pie is a staple; Y’all is the only proper pronoun; chicken is fried and biscuits come with gravy; everything is darling and someone is always getting their heart blessed. -unknown

Thursday, October 18, 2007

Flu Shots

It is quite nice to have a mother-in-law that works at a hospital. Melany told me Tuesday that she had ordered some flu shots for the boys. She took them today to the ER (where she works) and got two of the other nurses to give them their shots. Brooks is a child that has to plan, so he had already decided who was going to give him his, and who was going to give the shot to Reese.
Brooks seems to have a really high pain tolerance. Even as a little baby, he didn't usually cry when he got shots. (Now don't wander off in this story and think that I have it made...) Reese on the other hand is like most normal children and screams bloody murder. Melany said that when she held Reese down for his shot, he seemed to be madder at her about holding him down than getting the shot. I appreciate her doing that for me. Now she gets to look forward to taking Reese back next month to get the other half of his dose. What fun.

On a different note, I was getting on to Reese tonight at supper, about throwing his sippy cup on the floor. After I told him, "No, No!", he pointed at me and said "No, No." Oh no! He is not a baby anymore. I firmly believe he is entering the terrible twos even though he is 14 months old. He likes to fall in the floor and throw a fit if he doesn't get his way. He likes to play and plunder through everything in our house except his own toys. He likes to hit Brooks all the time. I am sure that is normal.
I try to think about the advise that my mom gave me a long time ago. She said that Granny would tell her that she could do anything anybody else could do. For example, you don't have to go climb Mt. Everest, you just have to make it through the day with a 14 month old. You can apply that to any aspect of your life, (job, family, etc). I know that many, even some who will read this, have successfully raised strong willed children, and so can I. Let's just pray that I haven't pulled out all my hair by the time he really turns 2.

5 comments:

Sylvia said...

The longer version of what Granny would say is, "If you are trying to do something that no one has ever done before then maybe you can say 'I can't'. Otherwise if they did it, then I can do it too."

tamara said...

I think the second one comes out fighting. I was mortified when I saw my precious little girl haul off and smack her brother. She started at about that age, and she's still doing it at almost three. It is definitely an adventure. We'll all make it through somehow!

Kristi said...

I think that we mothers of strong willed children should form our own coffee club and get support over some cafe latte...

Deirdre said...

Thanks for the entertainment. It's boring here today. Loved the earing story. I always told you that you had it too easy with Brooks. Glad Reese is keeping the house exciting!

Erika said...

That makes me feel so much better (sorry). I just remember at the reunion, Brooks strayed just a bit and you stopped him with, "Brooks" and a look. I was so impressed. Peyton is definitely my high maintenance child.